Arkitektura at Disenyo
Structural and Design Concepts
January 14 – May 7, 2010

Vicente Manansala;(Mixed Media) "Barong Barong on Reed Sun" 1966 The Museum at De La Salle University presents for the third term of academic year 2009–2010 an exhibit of architectural and structural concepts and ideas to be held from January 14 to May 7, 2009.

The exhibit features selected works that show Philippine architectural structures as subject or part of the composition (e.g. façade of a church, house or building; part of a house; doors, windows, etc.).

The artists interpret their experience of a particular place or scene and shape their self–image through the medium of studio art based on careful observation and rendering or real–world structures. The artworks are from drawings, prints and paintings that range from different art styles: realistic, expressionist, and abstract.

The exhibit is an attempt to encourage communication and interaction between artists, designers and architects.

The selections of artworks are from the Wili and Doreen Fernandez and De La Salle University Art Collections.

Objectives of the exhibition are:

  • To show how artists interpret architectural structures based on their keen observation.
  • To learn how artists come up with their own interpretations of architectural and structural concepts and ideas.
  • To showcase works of some Filipino artists for the viewers to learn how elements of art and principles of design were used by the artists in creating their works.

 

Exhibition Notes

The exhibit features selected works that show Philippine architectural structures as subject or part of the composition (e.g. house, or building; part of a house; doors, windows, etc.).

The artists interpret their experience of a particular place or scene–such as a facade of a church or parts of a house like doors and window and shape their self-image through the medium of studio art.

Featured in the exhibit are artworks from drawings, prints and paintings that range from different art styles: realistic, expressionist, and abstract.

The selections of artworks are from the Wili and Doreen Fernandez and De La Salle University Art Collections.

Architecture involves both the process and the product of designing and constructing spaces that reflect functional, aesthetic, and environmental considerations. As a process, it includes the practical use of the elements of design, planning, cost, and construction. It also requires the use of materials, technology, textures, light, and shadow within a specified space. A wider definition may comprise all design activity from the macro-level (urban design and landscape architecture) to the micro-level (construction and furniture details).

Architectural works are often perceived as cultural and political symbols and as works of art. Historical civilizations are often identified with their surviving architectural achievements.

Philippine architecture is a reflection of the country’s history and heritage. The most prominent historic constructions in the archipelago are from the Spanish Colonial period, though much of Philippine architecture is also influenced by Japanese, Malay, Hindu, Chinese, and American cultures.

The pre–colonial architecture of the Philippines consisted of the nipa hut made from natural materials. There are some traces of large–scale construction before the Spanish colonizers came but unfortunately are not well documented. An example of this is the pre–colonial walled city of Maynilad that later after the Spanish colonization, was dismantled by the Spaniards and rebuilt as Intramuros. Other minor pre–colonial walled cities can also be found at Betis and Macabebe in Pampanga.

Spanish culture dominated Philippine architecture during their three hundred years of colonization. The Spaniards, with their baroque style, taught us how to build forts, churches and schools. During this period, Intramuros, the walled city of Manila, was built with its walls, fortresses, houses, and churches. The Augustinian friars built a large number of grand churches all over the islands of the Philippines. Also, during this period the traditional bahay na bato style for the large mansion emerged. These were large houses built of wood and stone combining Filipino, Spanish, and Chinese style elements. The best preserved examples of these houses can be found in Vigan, Ilocos Sur and Taal, Batangas.

After the Spanish American war, the architecture of the Philippines was dominated by the American style. In this period, the plan for the modern city of Manila was designed, with a large number of art deco buildings that were built by famous American and Filipino architects. During the liberation of Manila by the Americans in 1945, large portions of Intramuros and Manila were destroyed. Many of the destroyed buildings were rebuilt in the period after the Second World War. American mission style architecture gave us the blueprints for our government structures as well as buildings of commerce.

At the end of the twentieth century straight lines and functional aspects were introduced in modern architecture. During this period many of the older structures were destroyed. In the early 21st century, a revival of the traditional Filipino elements in the architecture returned with the effort of architects and designers who believed that traditional Filipino elements have an excellent aesthetic value with their practicality and functionality.

Modern Philippine architecture is a reflection of what is uniquely Filipino with Malay, Hindu, Japanese, Spanish, Chinese, and American influences. The structures that we see and enjoy now remind us of the past and at the same time, give us a glimpse of the future. Philippine architecture has somehow managed to retain part of its identity that is distinctly Filipino despite the strong foreign influences. –rdb

REFERENCES

Castañeda,Dominador. Art in the Philippines. Quezon City: University of the Philippines, 1964

CCP Encyclopedia of Philippine Art, vol. 3 Philippine Architecture. Manila: Cultural Center of the Philippines, 1994

Coseteng. Alicia M. L. Spanish Churches in the Philippines. Quezon City: New Mercury printing Press, 1972

Tuklas Sining Essays on the Philippine Arts. Manila: Cultural Center of the Philippines, 1991

Zialcita, Fernando N. and Tinio, Martin I Jr. Philippine Ancestral Houses 1810–1930. Quezon City: GCF Books, 1980