Patterns:
In Layers of Meaning
June 26 – august 22, 2014

unknown PATTERNS: In Layers of Meaning is the major show for Academic Year 2014-2015, featuring works of art that show various forms and elements of patterns. Through repetition of lines, shapes, forms, tones, colors, and textures, these patterns create a strong visual interest. The works appear in different forms, from geometric to symmetrical designs.

The exhibit is designed to give the viewers an experience of how the artists incorporate patterns in their works to express meaning, movement, and action. Featured are works of National Artists for Visual Arts, namely Ang Kiukok, H.R. Ocampo, and Arturo Luz.

Other featured artists are Orlando Castillo, Roberto Chabet, Araceli Dans, Fernando Modesto, Alfredo Roces, Manuel Rodriguez, Sr., Ibarra dela Rosa, Rodolfo Samonte, and Alma Quinto. Also featured are rare works of Dr. Cirilo Bautista, DLSU Professor Emeritus and University Fellow and this year’s National Artist for Literature.

The featured works are from the Wili and Doreen Fernandez and University art collections and loaned works of two contemporary artists, Thelma Badon and Ferdinand Doctolero.

The exhibition is on view until August 22, 2014.

 

Works from the Wili and Doreen Fernandez Art Collections

National Artists

  • Ang Kiukok
  • Arturo Luz
  • H.R Ocampo

Prominent Filipino Modern and Contemporary Artists

  • Orlando Castillo
  • Roberto Chabet
  • Araceli Dans
  • Fernando Modesto
  • Alfredo Roces
  • Manuel Rodriguez, Sr.
  • Rodolfo Samonte

 

Works from the De La Salle University Art Collection

  • Alma Quinto
  • Cirilo Bautista
  • Ibarra Dela Rosa

Works of invited contemporary artists

  • Thelma Llorico Badon
  • Ferdinand Doctolero

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Introduction

The Museum at De La Salle University presents its major  show  for Academic  Year 2014-2015,
PATTERNS: In Layers of Meaning. The exhibit showcases works of art featuring various forms and elements of patterns-through shapes and colors, in geometric, decorative, or figurative forms.

Patterns can be seen from the detailed parts to the totality of the works. Patterns can be gleaned from a distance and from different directions. Side by side, works of artists on the same subject, form a coherent pattern.

The exhibition explores how artists incorporate patterns in their works to express meaning, movement, and action. It also shows how patterns in art can create a strong visual interest.

Featured works are from Wili and Doreen Fernandez and University Art Collections, with additional loaned works by selected Filipino artists.

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ARTIST’S QUOTES

“Painting patterns is my way of sharing my story.”

-Thelma Badon

“I had this reputation of being some kind of enfant terrible. It was like a role assigned to me so naturally that I didn’t want to disappoint anyone.”

-Roberto Chabet

“Thick lines of vivid and living colors creates boundaries for sacred spaces. The colors bind as their beauty breathes of freedom and joy. Places of rest and refuge for the wondering mind.”

-Ferdinand Doctolero

“You have to find your inspiration in your canvas.You don’t sit down and wait for it to come. You start, and then the inspiration comes.”

-Ang Kiukok

“My work is linear and geometric, and that’s it, essentially. I cannot imagine myself going conceptual or surrealistic tomorrow.”

-Arturo Luz

“I wanted to explore the possibility of simpler images, because so much in our lives is instantaneous, and there’s nothing mysterious about immediacy.”

-Fernando Modesto

“We were creating a new kind of reality. We weren’t really creating a painting ‘style.’ The only thing that all members had in common was that each was veering away from the realistic, strictly figurative type of painting.”

-H.R. Ocampo

“I look at art not as a career, but as a spiritual expression. Art should bring out what is innately beautiful, especially to those who are hopeless.”

-Alma Quinto

“First, I learned what is art and then I learned what is printmaking, so I want in my life to fulfill the purpose, to explain, or to teach, everyone or to start a school where you can learn what is art.”

-Manuel Rodriguez, Sr.

“I could make colorful abstract images; I could achieve depth and sculptural qualities. The process allowed me to achieve the effects I wanted in my art. It was closest to my sensibility at the time.”

-Rodolfo Samonte


Exhibition Notes

PATTERNS: In Layers of Meaning

The Museum presents for its major show for Academic Year 2014-2015 an exhibition entitled PATTERNS: In Layers of Meaning. The exhibition features works from the Wili and Doreen Fernandez and University art collections and loaned works of two contemporary artists, Thelma Badon and Ferdinand Doctolero.

The exhibit is designed to give the viewers an experience of how the artists incorporate patterns in their works to express meaning, movement, and action. It showcases works of art, presenting various forms and elements of patterns using an array of media, color palettes, themes, and varied techniques of an artist. It also shows how patterns in art can create a strong visual interest.

The exhibition is composed of works by National Artists of the country, namely Ang Kiukok, Arturo Luz and H.R. Ocampo. Ang Kiukok, National Artist for Visual Arts in 2001, is considered “one of the most dynamic figures in contemporary Philippine arts.” Kiukok specialized in geometric expressions and the common themes of his works are suffering, alienation and agony. His one and two figure series on exhibit present such description of Ang’s style. Selected works of Arturo Luz such as his wood relief and embossed series are also part of the exhibit. Arturo Luz was proclaimed National Artist for Visual Arts in 1997. He is known as printmaker, sculptor, designer, and art administrator. His masterpieces are minimalist, geometric abstracts and described as “a true Asian modernity.” The exhibit also showcased Ocampo’s nude series rendered in minimal swirling lines. Line and space were clearly emphasized to show the beauty of a female figure. The works of Ang, Ocampo, and Luz on one particular subject matter were arranged side by side to form one composition—a series of patterns.

The works of Manuel Rodriguez, Sr., the Father of Philippine Printmaking, and selected Filipino contemporary artists from the collections are also featured in the exhibit.

The term pattern is a repetition of an element or elements such as lines, shapes, tones, colors, textures, or forms in a work. It appears in different forms from geometric to the symmetrical designs. Geometric patterns are composed of geometric shapes such as square, triangle, rectangle, and circle. They may be represented in two-dimensional or three-dimensional. Every object you can see or touch has three dimensions that can be measured: length, width, and height. A shape only has two dimensions (such as width and height) and no thickness. Squares, circles, and triangles are two dimensional objects. Geometric shapes are found practically everywhere, although they often go unnoticed to the untrained eye. Geometric patterns have a great sense of depth, inviting the eye to explore its depths because of its yin and yang quality. Organic patterns are very much represented in the works of Badon on portraits of women. Organic shapes are shapes with a natural look and a flowing and curving appearance and are typically irregular or asymmetrical. Organic shapes are associated with things from the natural world, like plants and animals. Organic shapes are figures that have a natural look and a flowing, curving appearance like in the works of Doctolero. Different from geometric shapes, they are often referred to as curvilinear or free form shapes, as they can be made of angles, curves, or both. They generally don't have measurements that are uniform or perfect. From a practical standpoint, this makes it much more mathematically complex to calculate measurements such as area and volume.

Works of conceptual artist, Roberto Chabet, his envelope series, and Fernando Modesto’s Trumpo or Toy Tops series showcase playful movements through patterns of forms and shapes. The other featured artists are Araceli Dans, Alfredo Roces, Ibarra dela Rosa, Rodolfo Samonte, and Orlando Castillo.  Also featured are rare works of the newly proclaimed National Artist for Literature and DLSU Professor Emeritus and University Fellow, Dr.Cirilo Bautista, his pen and ink works. This time he used his pen, not to write words, but to create artworks – his interpretation of guitarman, dancers, and the exodus.

 

 

Collateral Activity   

ART TALK

The Effects of Pattern in Personal Characterization

by

Ms. Thelma Badon
Artist and Art Educator

on

July 18, 2014, Friday,  1:30-3:00P.M.
2nd Floor, Yuchengco Hall
The Museum at De La Salle University
2401 Taft Avenue, Manila

 

This lecture is a collateral activity in conjunction with the ongoing exhibition PATTERNS: In Layers of Meaning. The exhibition shows how patterns give a strong element of interest to a composition in drawing, painting, print, mixed media, and sculpture.  Featured works are from the Wili and Doreen Fernandez and University Art Collections, with additional loaned works by two contemporary artists, Thelma Badon and Ferdinand Doctolero.

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Thelma Llorico-Badon, a Master of Arts in Learning and Teaching graduate at the  De La Salle University, is a Teaching Artist at the Fine Arts Department of St. Scholastica’s College in Manila and at the Southville International School and Colleges teaching Art Appreciation and major Advertising courses. She was with the DLS-College of St. Benilde for 14 years handling Aesthetics and core Design subjects.

She traces her fascination for the arts from her father's love for music and the arts. In college, she took up Fine Arts and had a rich experience early in her career as a textile designer. Thelma does painting, drawing and sculpting within the general styles of Art Nouveau and Fauvism. She continues to be artistically creative because of the overflowing inspiration she enjoys at home from her husband and daughters who also are gifted artists.  She has a one-woman show aptly titled "GUHIT BABAE" which means "woman's drawing" in Filipino. She has joined several art group shows as well. She is adept with acrylic, gouache, and soft pastel as her visual arts media.